Class Descriptions 2019-2020

How to use this document

Do not print! The big font is for easy on-screen reading and makes this document very long and expensive for printing.

Parents should read EVERY SECTION including the General Information for each category that applies to their family. There are changes every year.

If viewing this document on your phone, you may use your phone's back arrow < to go back to the contents' links; if on your computer, the links are listed on the side of the document.

In each class description, note what to purchase for students, if anything. Even if two descriptions sound similar for children of different ages, please read each description, looking for small changes in supplies or expectations.

Any class or rental fees are paid at orientation, and books rented are picked up that same day.

If readers have a paper and pen ready to record supplies needed, they will avoid having to read this document twice. Only required or recommended items are listed for each class. Parents and students will want to think through how they do and organize their work because they will likely need additional school supplies to bring to co-op (such as writing utensils, notebooks, dividers, binders, and notebook paper).

If there are questions, parents should ask immediately so this document can be improved. Lead teachers, please make suggestions to correct or clarify.

Underlined words that turn green when you select them are links with further information and/or ordering information. Just click on them. Sometimes only one link is given. On that page, scroll down to get the ISBN number so shopping can be done wherever the family would like.

In explaining annual course rotations, "odd years" refers to school years beginning in an odd numbered year (i.e. 2001-2002), and "even years" refers to school years beginning in an even numbered year (i.e. 2002-2003).

For now, only the lead teachers are listed under each class name.

PRESCHOOL AND KINDERGARTEN

Preschool Coordinator - Marcy C.

Preschool and Kinder - General Information

Please note what teachers in the preschool have asked parents to pack for little ones. Their jobs are very hard, and not having what they need for EACH child makes their jobs harder! Please diligently restock the children's bags each Thursday evening (don't forget diapers and wipes).

Infants and Babies

(under one year by September 1)

Lead Support Mom: Marcy C.

Newborn and baby care are dependent on the pattern and preference of the mom. Moms often care for newborns and younger babies throughout the day. Due to the amount of people and motion in the building, any non-crawling baby should be, for their safety, held or carried in a sling or support. Nursery workers gladly welcome babies into the nursery. If you are a mom with a newborn or young baby and need help, please let the preschool coordinator know.

As soon as babies are more active and mobile, they are loved on throughout the day in the nursery. Naps, feeding, and safe play are all happening in the nursery where the Bears class also meets. Due to the number of people and the amount of motion in the building, all mobile babies will need to be, for their safety, in the nursery.

These little ones are on rosters by age. "Infants" are children with birthdays after September 1st of this school year. Babies are children with their first birthdays before September 1st of this school year. Once babies start walking well, they are moved to the Bears roster (see below).

Lions, Tigers, and Bears -- Oh MY!


Bears

(One year old by September 1)

Lead Teacher: Rachel C.

The Bears have a secure day in a toddler-appropriate room. There is an open floor with toys to play with and rockers for love and snuggles. Tender loving care makes Fridays familiar and fun.

Have Bears bring a labeled sippy cup and plenty of diapers each week. Because they have a naptime, a favorite blanket and lovie might make them comfier. Each Bear must have a labeled Kindermat. Mats are kept at co-op until the end of the school year. If mats were left last year, they are still in the supply room. If one is needed, see the Wal-Mart school supply aisle. Before purchasing, parents should check with the supply-room coordinator at orientation. There are likely donated ones from previous years that can be used for the year.

Bears might go outside to play or take a wagon ride. Keep this in mind when choosing their clothes and shoes for the day.

Each Bear is picked up at lunchtime by a parent or older sibling. Do not be late so the teachers can get to lunch with their own children! If parents are going to have older siblings pick up children, make sure the teachers are introduced to them.

After lunch, moms should change the diaper of their Bear so he is ready for a good nap. Most moms help get their Bears settled on their mats for naptime before they leave.

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Bears Supply List:

◻ Sippy Cup (labeled with child’s name)

◻ Kindermat (labeled)

◻ Diapers and wipes

◻ Blanket and/or lovie for naps



Tigers


(Two years old before September 1)

Lead Teacher: Jan O.

The Tigers enjoy a day of free play with a subtle routine. They are offered a variety of activities and enjoy tender loving care as they play alongside each other. They have an outdoor play time and a naptime.

Have Tigers bring a labeled water bottle or sippy cup and plenty of diapers each week. Because they have a naptime, a favorite blanket and lovie might make them comfier. Each Tiger must also bring a labeled Kindermat. Mats are kept at co-op until the end of the school year. If mats were left last year, they are still in the supply room. If one is needed, see the Wal-Mart school supply aisle. Before purchasing, parents should check with the supply-room coordinator at orientation. There are likely donated ones from previous years that can be used for the year.

All preschool classes have some time outside every day, so keep this in mind when choosing their clothes and shoes for the day.

Each Tiger needs to be picked up at lunchtime by a parent or older sibling. Please be on time so the teachers can get to lunch with their own children. If parents are going to have older siblings pick up children, make sure the teachers are introduced to them.

After lunch, moms should change their Tigers’ diapers or take potty-trained Tigers to the restroom so they are ready for a good nap.

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Tigers Supply List:

◻ Sippy Cup or Water Bottle (labeled with child’s name)

◻ Kindermat (labeled)

◻ Diapers and wipes

◻ Blanket and/or lovie for naps


Lions

(Three years old by September 1)

Lead Teacher: Tabitha D.

The Lions engage in active learning as they play games, do crafts, listen to books, and more. They follow a familiar routine of play and activity. Basic concepts like colors, seasons, animals, and weather are reinforced through simple, thematic activities. They have an outdoor playtime and a naptime.

Have Lions bring a labeled water bottle or sippy cup each week. Because they have a nap time, a favorite blanket and lovie might make them comfier. Each Lion must also bring a labeled Kindermat. Mats are kept at co-op until the end of the school year. If mats were left last year, they are still in the supply room. If one is needed, see the Wal-Mart school supply aisle. Before purchasing, parents should check with the supply-room coordinator at orientation. There are likely donated ones from previous years that can be used for the year.

All preschool classes have some time outside every day. Keep this in mind when choosing their clothes and shoes for the day.

Each Lion is picked up at lunchtime by a parent or older sibling. Please do not be late so the teachers can get to lunch with their own children. If parents are going to have older siblings pick up children, make sure the teachers are introduced to them.

After lunch, moms should take potty-trained Lions to the restroom or change their Lions’ diapers so they are ready for good naps.

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Lions Supply List:

◻ Sippy Cup or Water Bottle (labeled with child’s name)

◻ Kindermat (labeled)

◻ Diapers and wipes

◻ Blanket and/or lovie for naps

Naptime tip for Lions, Tigers, and Bears

Several years ago, a mom was concerned about how her daughter would do at co-op naptime. She decided they needed to practice, so several times per week the mom would have her daughter take her nap at home on the floor on her Kindermat. She explained that they were practicing for naps at co-op. It took some training, but by co-op, the daughter was happily sleeping on the Kindermat with her special blanket and lovie.

Pre-K

(Four years old by September 1)

Lead Teacher: Kim L.

The Pre-K Kiddos play and learn while enjoying unit studies packed with developmentally-appropriate arts and crafts, reading, games, music, and more. They have a weekly outside playtime, music class, and rest time.

Pre-K Kiddos need to bring a labeled water bottle each week. At this age, many don’t sleep, but they still have a quiet rest time. A favorite blanket and lovie may make this comfier. Each Pre-K Kiddo needs to bring a labeled Kindermat. Mats are kept at co-op until the end of the school year. If mats were left last year, they are still in the supply room. If one is needed, see the Wal-Mart school supply aisle. Before purchasing, parents should check with the supply-room coordinator at orientation. There are likely donated ones from previous years that can be used for the year.

Each Pre-K Kiddo needs to be picked up at lunchtime by a parent or older sibling. Please be on time so the teachers can get to lunch with their own children. If parents are going to have older siblings pick up children, parents should make sure the teachers are introduced to them.

All preschool classes have some time outside every day. Keep this in mind when choosing their clothes and shoes for the day.

After lunch, moms should take Pre-K Kiddos to the restroom, so they are ready for rest time.

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Pre-K Supply List:

◻ Water Bottle (labeled with child’s name)

◻ Kindermat (labeled)

◻ Blanket and/or lovie for naps


Kindergarten

(Five years old by September 1)

Lead Teacher: Stephanie Y.

The kindergartners enjoy a literature-rich unit study approach that complements their education at home. The kindergartners have some time outside every day. Keep this in mind when choosing their clothes and shoes for the day.

Kindergartners need to bring a one-subject spiral or composition book on the first day. The teachers put their names on them and keep them at co-op for the year. Each week the parent should send a bag, backpack or satchel, and a labeled water bottle.

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Kindergarten Supply List:

◻ One-subject spiral or composition book

◻ Bag, backpack or satchel (labeled with child's name)

◻ Water Bottle (labeled with child’s name)

ELEMENTARY

First through Sixth Grades

Curriculum Coordinator – Christie G.


Elementary - General Information

First and second graders travel as a unit.

Third and fourth graders travel as a unit.

Fifth and sixth graders travel as a unit.

Although the three double-grade groups often have the same subjects, the content is adjusted to be developmentally appropriate for the various ages.

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1st-6th General Supply List:

◻ Backpack or satchel (labeled with child's name)

◻ Inexpensive binder or folder (to hold handouts, art, etc.)

◻ Sharpened Pencil (every week!!)

◻ 1st-4th Water Bottle for PE (labeled with child's name)

A note about PE water bottles: this can be their lunch bottle refilled or a new bottle, but if it is their lunch bottled refilled, that refilling should be done at the end of lunch with mom, not at the beginning of PE.

Helpful Tip:

Preparing the backpack or satchel the night before is an excellent opportunity for the younger students to learn responsibility. An index card in the backpack with a printed list of the weekly contents is convenient.

Writing Workshop – 1st-6th Graders

Lead Teacher – Amy Mc.

First through sixth grade students participate in low-stress writing workshops at co-op. The focus of these classes is to learn the process of writing and how to evaluate writing. The elementary writing classes provide the time and opportunity for young authors to build and strengthen writing skills, share their work, find their voice, and develop a love for writing.

The cornerstone of instruction is the 6+1 traits. The instructional text for the classes is 6 + 1 Traits of Writing: The Complete Guide, Grades 3 and Up by Ruth Culham. This book is for the teachers -- both co-op teachers and home teachers, but not for the students. Parents should consider purchasing and reading this book in segments as their students get to each of the six traits. This equips the parents to use the vocabulary of 6+1 to support their students and to discuss and evaluate their students' writing at home. Parents enjoy having a clear approach to interact with their students at home, building on the foundation laid by teachers at co-op.

Parents can apply this method regardless of the type of writing they (or other curricula) assign at home. The book by Ruth Culham is a great resource for parents of ALL age groups, even high school. There are many wonderful resources online for using this concept. Search “6+1 Writing Traits" in any search engine. Pinterest is loaded with ideas.

At home, parents use their preferred writing assignments or curricula to keep their students writing, or they simply use journaling assignments to make writing happen. Most weeks, students are given writing prompts to complete at home, although these are meant to be a help and never mandatory assignments. There is an assumption that elementary students are writing at home for their parents, and once the child writes anything, the parents can use the 6+1 writing concept to interact with their students about their writing. Many parents have found specific curricula and writing plans to use at home that complement what the students are learning at co-op. For example, consider Daily 6-Trait Writing. Parents are encouraged to share good resources (websites, worksheets, programs, etc.) on the loop and at the Moms' Table.

The students in the 5th/6th writing class are encouraged to take pieces of writing from home through the writing process to the point of publishing. “Publishing” means presenting the piece, polished and ready to share, with the class and teachers. Once per semester, teachers offer their feedback on a piece of writing. For teacher feedback to be available, parents must sign-off that the papers have been through the 6+1 process at home. If going through the 6+1 process at home sounds intimidating, the writing teachers and other moms at the Moms’ Table will be helpful. Parents of 5th/6th grade students should seriously consider purchasing or borrowing the book by Ruth Culham to read along and learn the traits. This helps in communicating with their students at home.

Each 1st through 6th grade student needs a folder with brads and a spiral notebook with wide-rule paper. It is helpful if the first graders have notebooks with handwriting paper suitable for beginning writers. They should be ready to transition to regular notebook paper in the spring.

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1st-6th Writing Workshop Supply List:

◻ Spiral Notebook with wide-rule paper

◻ (1st Grade) Notebook with handwriting paper for beginning writers - something with a vertical layout such as this.

◻ Bradded Folder

◻ Sharpened Pencil


Elementary Science - General Information

Apologia's Exploring Creation elementary science books are the texts for the elementary science classes. There are seven books in this series. The six years of elementary co-op science are taught from our favorite six volumes.

For all of the elementary science book choices, owning a book gives parents free resources to go with that book at www.apologia.com/bookextras. A password can be found in the introduction to each book.

There might be a small fee associated with some science classes for take-home projects. This will be collected during the year or at orientation.

1st/2nd Grades Elementary Science

Lead Teacher: Karla D.

Lead Teacher: Lisa P.

The 1st/2nd and 3rd/4th science classes follow a rotation through four Apologia elementary textbooks. The rotation is as follows:

Year 1: Botany (Apologia's Exploring Creation with Botany)

Year 2: Astronomy (Apologia's Exploring Creation with Astronomy)

Year 3: Swimming Creatures (Apologia's Exploring Creation with Zoology 2 - Swimming Creatures of the Fifth Day)

Year 4: Flying Creatures (Apologia's Exploring Creation with Zoology 1 - Flying Creatures of the Fifth Day)

2019-2020 is Botany!

Because the teachers in 1st/2nd science cover the content and use suggested activities in these books thoroughly enough, purchasing the books to read at home is not necessary for class participation in this age group. Of course, families may want to have the book at home for their own purposes, especially if older siblings in the 3rd/4th grade are reading the same material. Those families who do choose to follow along will find a helpful reading schedule on the Classroom Connections, though such participation is not at all expected or required.

Again, the purchase of any of these books is NOT necessary for 1st/2nd graders’ learning experience at co-op.

Book Information:

Be aware that there are many supplementary resources mixed in with the textbooks on the sites below. Consider also that Mardel is within driving distance, if you are interested in seeing the books. Lastly, consider asking around for books in the group for borrowing or purchasing used.

Reviews and prices of the elementary science books can be found here:

Apologia

Christian Book Distributors

Rainbow

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1st/2nd Science Supply List:

◻ OPTIONAL: Apologia's Exploring Creation with Botany

1" 3-ring binder

3rd/4th Grades Elementary Science

Lead Teacher: Karla D.

Lead Teacher: Lisa P.

The 1st/2nd and 3rd/4th science classes follow a rotation through four Apologia elementary textbooks. The rotation is as follows:

Year 1: Botany (Apologia's Exploring Creation with Botany)

Year 2: Astronomy (Apologia's Exploring Creation with Astronomy)

Year 3: Swimming Creatures (Apologia's Exploring Creation with Zoology 2 - Swimming Creatures of the Fifth Day)

Year 4: Flying Creatures (Apologia's Exploring Creation with Zoology 1 - Flying Creatures of the Fifth Day)

2019-2020 is Botany!

3rd/4th grade science students each need to purchase a plastic 1” 3-ring binder.

The Apologia science books provide notebooking pages. Parents of 3rd/4th students need to go to the CHEC website to download and print pages custom made for this class. The notebooking pages should be placed in each student's 3-ring binder and brought to the first co-op class. Binders will be kept at co-op for the school year.

The co-op teacher’s reading schedule is available on the 3rd/4th grade Classroom Connection. The weekly reading exposes the students to the concepts before they come to class so they are prepared to review the material and complete activities. Most students at this age benefit from the parent reading it aloud.

Why pre-read? Those students who pre-read are noticeably more engaged in the class discussions. They often share things they found interesting in the reading, which enriches what is happening in the class. Pre-reading is an investment that pays off.

Book Information:

Be aware that there are many supplementary resources mixed in with the textbooks on the sites below. Also, consider that Mardel is within driving distance, if you are interested in seeing the books. They usually have very competitive prices and need to be supported. Lastly, consider asking around for books in the homeschool community for borrowing or purchasing used.

Reviews and prices of the elementary science books can be found here:

Apologia

Christian Book Distributors

Rainbow

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3rd/4th Science Supply List:

◻ Apologia's Exploring Creation with Botany

◻ 1" 3-ring binder

◻ Notebooking Pages from CHEC's website - Printed, Punched and Placed in the Binder (see above for more info)


5th/6th Grades Elementary Science

Lead Teacher - Lecture: Craig D.

Lead Teacher - Activities: Lea C.

The 5th/6th science class alternates learning about Anatomy and Physiology (odd numbered years) and Chemistry and Physics (even numbered years). The texts for these classes are Apologia's Exploring Creation with Human Anatomy and Physiology and Apologia's Exploring Creation with Chemistry and Physics.

2019-2020 is Anatomy and Physiology!

For this age group, the families need to purchase or borrow the book being used in class and use the co-op teacher’s reading schedule to expose the students to the concepts before they come to class. Class time is used to review the material and do the related activities. Most, if not all, of the 5th/6th grade students are able to do their science reading on their own.

Why pre-read? In response to this question, the teachers shared that they can tell which students have had exposure to the concepts before class. Those students are more engaged in the class discussions and seem to be building on a foundation. They often share with the class things they found interesting in the reading, which enriches what is happening in the class. Pre-reading is an investment that pays off.

When each family has a copy of the textbook at their house, this gives the teacher freedom to use materials associated with the text with no concern for copyright infringement. If the password in the book is ever needed for materials on the Apologia website, each family needs to have a book in their home dedicated to their family alone (borrowed or owned). No one should ask for or share the password to get material.

Book Information:

Be aware that there are many supplementary resources mixed in with the textbooks on the sites below. Also, consider that Mardel is within driving distance, if you are interested in seeing the books. They usually have very competitive prices and need to be supported. Lastly, consider asking around for books in the homeschool community for borrowing or purchasing used.

Reviews and prices of the Anatomy and Physiology book can be found here:

Apologia

Rainbow

Christian Book Distributors

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5th/6th Science Supply List:

◻ Apologia's Exploring Creation with Human Anatomy and Physiology


Social Science/History

Foundations – 1st/2nd Graders

Lead Teacher: Aliza K.

Lead Teacher - Activities: Kim S.

The purpose of this class is to build a firm foundation for the future when a deeper understanding of more advanced academic concepts is expected. This class focuses on all those little things that we may forget to teach at home but are essential building blocks. Class time is devoted to a variety of hands-on activities and read-alouds that foster students' understanding of the world God has made and where they fit into it. Specifically, the class aims to teach some important geography (U.S. and World). Think of it as a fun, busy, and potentially messy time hanging important hooks in the brain.

This year the students will "pack their bags" and head out into the World! They will be learning about and exploring the 7 continents and who and what lives on each one. Using their eyes, ears, and hands, students will learn all they can about God's amazing creations seen in nature, culture, and people. The children will also learn about some favorite holidays and traditions during their travels. Living books, hands-on activities, and games will all be featured in this enjoyable journey around the world.

Please make sure your child has a pencil every Friday.

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Foundations Supply List:

◻ Pencil


Elementary History – 3rd/4th and 5th/6th Graders

Lead Teacher - Story Telling: Joy G.

Lead Teacher - Activities: Laura B.

Using people and events as a springboard to travel back in time, Joy tells the tales of God’s hand in history. Students discover and continue to learn that the sovereign God has chosen them to be a part of His Story right now. They are inspired by how He has always used people, places, and events to fulfill His glorious plan for the redemption of mankind and His creation!

Laura uses activities and crafts to help the students experience different cultures and times.

The class text is The Mystery of History (MOH). The MOH website has general information about the series and specific information about the four volumes. There is also a video on the homepage that briefly describes the program. Although there are four volumes of the Mystery of History curriculum, this class covers only the first three volumes in 3rd-6th grade history (over four years). Here is the schedule showing the volumes used in the 4-year rotation.

1st year - MOH Vol. 1

2nd year - MOH Vols. 1 & 2

3rd year - MOH Vols. 2 & 3

4th year - MOH Vol. 3

This school year (2019-2020) is the 2nd year in the rotation, so the class will use The Mystery of History, Volume 1 – Creation to the Resurrection and The Mystery of History, Volume 2: The Early Church and the Middle Ages.

For families interested in using MOH books at home, a reading plan is provided on the Elementary History Classroom Connection.

According to the MOH copyright agreement, each family must have a license to participate in a class where resources from the curriculum are used. This license is yours if:

  • your family purchases the book (see below for sites), or
  • your family borrows the book, or
  • you purchase a license from CHEC for each MOH volume for each of your children in the class. This option does not offer written material to read during the week. Cost is $5 per child in class. On years where two volumes are used, $5 per child will be paid per volume. Those who purchased the license for the same volume last year or four years ago need not repurchase a license for the same child.

Parents interested in purchasing the license per student or with questions about the licensing issue should contact Laura B.

The book can be found online here:

Bright Ideas Press

Christianbook.com

Rainbow Resource

The Mystery of History

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3rd-6th History Supply List:

◻ Either The Mystery of History, Volume 1 (text or audio version) and The Mystery of History, Volume 2 OR Pay $5 per child per book for the licensing fee


Fine Arts

Music (with a Splash of Spanish) - 1st/2nd Graders

Lead Teacher: Brandi T.

Splash of Spanish: Andrea C.

“The aim and final end of all music should be none other than the glory of God and the refreshment of the soul.” - J.S. Bach

Students have fun learning about musical styles, composers, and instruments through listening and movement. Through visual aids, games, and physical activity, we will learn rhythms and begin music theory and ear training.

A short Spanish lesson will be provided at the beginning of 1st and 2nd grade Music. Basic Spanish vocabulary and a bit of grammar will be introduced. Lessons will be short and sweet.

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1st/2nd Music Supply List:

◻ Folder or 3-ring binder for music handouts. Please bring to every class.

Music (with a Splash of Spanish) - 3rd/4th Graders

Lead Teacher: Brandi T.

Splash of Spanish: Andrea C.

“The aim and final end of all music should be none other than the glory of God and the refreshment of the soul.” - J.S. Bach

3rd and 4th grade students explore composers, learn ear training, and sing using sheet music. Please supply a 1” 3-ring binder to collect materials for music theory, instrument recognition, and sheet music.

On odd years, students also learn recorder. 2019-2020 is the year of the recorder, so please plan to purchase a $5.00 recorder through CHEC. You may use an older sibling's Yamaha recorder.

A short Spanish lesson will be provided at the beginning of 3rd and 4th grade Music. Basic Spanish vocabulary and a bit of grammar will be introduced. Lessons will be short and sweet.

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3rd/4th Music Supply List:

◻ 1" 3-ring binder

◻ $5.00 to be paid at orientation or a Yamaha Recorder

Art – 5th Graders

Lead Teacher: Crystal C.

The 5th graders spend the first half of the year drawing and the second half painting. All supplies are provided by co-op. Each child is assigned a numbered box during drawing, and a numbered felt roll-up (painting tools container) during painting to use throughout the class. Parents of 5th grade students pay a $3 art fee to maintain these supplies and purchase consumable products. Parents should discuss with their students the importance of caring for the supplies in their boxes so they will be in good condition for the students who will use their boxes next year.

From Crystal:

Drawing: The students experience the joys of being creative and expressing themselves through art while learning the basics of drawing. They will build a foundation for drawing by learning to sketch lines and basic shapes to build what they see. They learn about space, shape, proportions, 2D and 3D, shading, light and dark, texture, perspective, composition, layout, design, balance, etc. Students will also touch on art history and look at famous drawings from master artists. While this is not a project-driven class, one goal includes working toward a frame-able final drawing project to be displayed at the end of the school year.

Painting: The academics of painting include the science of color-mixing, how to identify the different types and uses of paintbrushes, looking at master painters from the past, and more! Painting skills include color-mixing, handling all the different types of paint brushes, doing a little “follow-the-leader” work and more-- and ending with a big end-of-year paint project on canvas.

On painting days aprons will be provided by the teacher.

Students will need to purchase a sketchbook for weekly drawing assignments. The specifications are below:

  • size 8 x 10 up to 9 x 13
  • white paper
  • "acid-free" (if possible)
  • at least 25 pages
  • does not have to be expensive
  • can be found locally at Wal-Mart and Staples (can also sometimes be found at grocery stores or dollar stores) and at Michaels or Hobby Lobby

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5th Grade Art Supply List:

◻ Pay $3 art fee

◻ sketchbook

Music Appreciation – 6th Graders

Lead Teacher: Debbie C.

Over the course of the year, students journey from the Baroque Period of music to the Modern Period. Students learn not only about specific pieces of music, but also about the composers—where they lived, what was going on at the time to influence their lives, etc. They also study the formation of the orchestra and each type of musical instrument. Through listening to music together in class, students learn how to identify music by great composers and name instruments by sound. Students will learn how to take notes in class, and a minimal amount of work may be done at home.

Each student needs a composition notebook to make a portfolio of major composers, dates, major works, etc.

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6th Grade Music Supply List:

◻ Composition notebook

PE & Games – 1st/2nd and 3rd/4th Graders

Lead Teacher: Heather V.

The students play games outside, weather permitting, with the goal of learning to exercise their bodies through teamwork in a group play setting.

The three requirements for PE include:

  • Proper attire - good shoes (no flip flops)
  • Plenty to drink - bring a water bottle labeled with the student’s name
  • Positive attitude

Unless you communicate with the PE teachers that you have given your student a pass on PE for a specific day or time, we expect him or her to participate happily. If there is a pass given, the student should stay with the parent in the building.

Our goal is to glorify Christ through our attitudes and actions. He has given us amazing bodies to perform marvelous actions. Hopefully through exercise and the fun of play, we can glorify Him in all we do.

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1st-4th PE Supply List:

◻ Water bottle (labeled with child's name)

◻ Good shoes (no flip flops)

Book Club (with a Splash of Spanish)– 5th/6th Graders

Lead Teacher: Beth P.

Splash of Spanish: Andrea C.

Book Club provides students the opportunity to read assigned literature at home and engage in discussions and activities in class related to that reading. A printable schedule of the reading assignments and book list is posted on the Classroom Connection page at the beginning of the year. The list and schedule cover the entire co-op year and do not change.

Weekly reading IS required to participate fully in this class. Through classroom discussions and activities, the class explores different literary devices and genres. Students also read and learn about poetry throughout the year.

The literature is carefully selected for this age group and meets the needs of a wide range of reading abilities. If a parent sees a child struggling with a book, the parent should not hesitate to step in and do some reading aloud or some shared reading with him or her. The students are not asked to read aloud in class.

Parents should make every effort to secure copies of the books for their children by the appointed times. The scheduling is paced so the reading can easily be accommodated in an average school week. Many of the books selected are available at local libraries, at used bookstores and in the homeschool community for borrowing. Students may use e-readers as long as they are permitted to bring them to co-op to use in class.

A plastic 3-ring binder is required for all new students. Returning students need to bring their notebook from the previous year. The students are expected to bring this notebook to class weekly, along with the current book being read at home. Materials are added to this notebook during the two years the students are in this class.

A short Spanish lesson will be provided at the beginning of 5th and 6th grade Book Club. Basic Spanish vocabulary and a bit of grammar will be introduced. Lessons will be short and sweet.


Book List for 2019-2020:

1. Sign of the Beaver by Elizabeth George Speare

2. Love that Dog by Sharon Creech

3. Half Magic by Edward Eager

4. Amos Fortune, Free Man by Elizabeth Yates

5. FOR GIRLS: Number the Stars by Lois Lowry

FOR BOYS: Snow Treasure by Marie McSwigan

6. The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin

7. Summer of the Monkeys by Wilson Rawls

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5th/6th Book Club Supply List:

◻ Plastic 3-ring binder

◻ Books from list above. These are also posted on the Classroom Connection page.

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

7th and 8th Grades

Curriculum Coordinator - Christie G.

Junior High History

Lead Teacher: Cristen W.

Most public schools and many private schools offer state history in the 7th grade and American history in 8th grade. CHEC has discovered that in order to do justice to American history, the class needs more time to study the people and events of the entire country. Therefore, junior high American history is offered on a two-year rotation. Odd-numbered years cover the explorers up to the Civil War. Even-numbered years begin with the Civil War and go as close to recent history as time allows. Whether a student comes into junior high history the first or second half does not matter. They learn both halves eventually.

Texas history, being better understood in the context of America's history, is studied as it naturally arises in the story. Texas geography and government are addressed in short units.

Students read assigned pages each week to prepare for classroom lectures and discussions. Frequent at-home activities enhance the reading and help develop the study skills necessary to engage and retain content-based subjects (such as history and science).

The 10-book series A History of US by Joy Hakim is the primary text for this class. Books 1-5 are used on odd years, and books 6-9 are used even years (book 10 is not required for co-op). Although this series is very expensive new, it can be borrowed from local libraries, borrowed or purchased from other CHEC/CHEMPA members, and purchased used, whole or in parts, on sites like amazon.com.

The Hakim series is used by many homeschool and Christian groups because Mrs. Hakim does such a fine job of telling the story of the country. She is thorough and interesting, but occasionally her perspective is inconsistent with a Biblical worldview or conservative viewpoint. The co-op teachers are aware of the viewpoint and challenge the students to think through what is true. Sonlight has a good explanation of why and how they use A History of US. Sonlight explains, “We balance Hakim's more liberal perspective with extensive notes in the Instructor's Guide (IG). These notes offer counter arguments to some of Hakim's perspectives. With A History of US and the IG combined, you have an extraordinary tool to help your children think critically about and truly understand American history.” The CHEC JH History teachers have the Sonlight Instructor’s Guide to use as a resource. It is assumed that junior high students are old enough to parse out different perspectives, especially with co-op presenting input from a Biblical worldview and a more conservative view of history. Parents are encouraged to interact with their students about what they are reading. For instance, the teachers do not assign much of the first book, which covers "pre-history" from a non-creationist perspective. It is a GREAT opportunity for parents and kids to read and discuss what others believe and then what the Bible has to say about creation.

Here are three places to look at the Hakim book:

Amazon

Rainbow

Sonlight

Co-op owns a set of Texas history textbooks that are checked out to students at orientation. Although there is no rental fee, there is a fee if the book is lost or abused.

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7th/8th History Supply List:

A History of US, books 1-5, by Joy Hakim

◻ Composition Notebook

◻ Map colors/crayons


Junior High Writing Program - General Information

The writing programs at CHEC focus on developing clear and effective communication of ideas and positions with proper structure and style, and when necessary, correct documentation of sources.

A NOTE ON GRAMMAR

Although grammar naturally comes up in the writing classes and curricula, teachers do NOT cover formal grammar in the CHEC writing classes. For a student to be in a CHEC writing class, he must be doing a grammar program at home. If a parent does not feel equipped to teach grammar at home, she can learn alongside her student. Everyone needs good grammar.

Most formal grammar curricula include composition. Parents should consider skipping some, most, or all the composition assignments in their grammar curricula since students are already taking writing at co-op.

There are MANY grammar programs available for purchase. Ask for favorites on the loop.

*****Recommended Resource for 7th/8th grade*****

Although co-op writing teachers do not teach formal grammar, they often mark grammar and mechanical mistakes when giving feedback on a paper. Because the students are all using different grammar programs at home, it is difficult, if not impossible, for the teacher to send them to the appropriate pages in their grammar programs.

Since every home should have a good grammar handbook with all grammar and mechanics rules, CHEC is asking all families with junior high students in a writing class to consider purchasing Writers INC: A Student Handbook for WRITING and LEARNING. Then teachers can easily point their students to a needed explanation in this resource.

Writers INC has everything from rules on commas to how to write a cause-and-effect essay. It is an excellent resource for every family and one that students need now and in college. There are several editions; any should do.

Writers INC is NOT a grammar curriculum. It does not provide exercises and practice. Students need to continue their grammar development through a curriculum that challenges them to practice and edit using the rules of the English language.

Amazon is one place to purchase new and used copies of Writers INC.

HOMEWORK

To participate in a writing class, the students MUST complete the writing assignments the week they are due and submit them in the form required by the teacher (or curriculum). The teachers should let the parents know if the student is not handing in his or her work or not following instructions, but the parent really should know the status of the work as she oversees it at home. As in all classes, parents should find time occasionally to talk to their students' writing teachers and ask for an honest assessment of the students' diligence and progress. Sometimes teachers need encouragement to share honestly how students are doing-- especially if it is not all good news.

WriteShop I

Lead Teacher: Nancy H.

For a description of the curriculum, see www.writeshop.com and choose WriteShop I. This writing program emphasizes clarity, conciseness, word choice, and sentence variety. The focus is on learning to write strong paragraphs by practicing a wide range of writing activities and by practicing clear editing techniques.

This class is for all 7th graders and new-to-co-op 8th graders. Because WriteShop II builds on the foundation laid by WriteShop I, 8th graders are placed in WriteShop I for the first year to learn the program. This is to increase their comfort and likelihood of success in the co-op writing program.

The teacher introduces each week's lesson at co-op, and the students complete four related days of homework in their student workbooks. The week's lessons usually produce a paper (short paragraph - 5-10 sentences long), which they bring back to class for feedback. Parents oversee the homework and check the writing assignments for required elements using check sheets from the manual. There is instruction at orientation on how to do this. Parents do not need to purchase teacher manuals to do their part; the answer key will be scanned and uploaded onto the website with password protection for the parents to access online for their reference.

The 4th edition used at co-op has traditionally been in a large, navy three-ring binder. That is still available. If purchased from WriteShop, they now publish the exact same information in a soft-side workbook. Either type book, binder or soft-side, is correct for co-op.

Most families make copies of needed sheets, so the manual stays clean for future children/students.

Each 7th grade student needs a WriteShop I Student Workbook:

Rainbow

WriteShop

It is also available as a downloadable PDF E-book that can be purchased from WriteShop and printed for multiple students in your family.

Families may be able to borrow or buy one used. Because CHEC has used this curriculum many years, there are plenty of copies floating around CHEC and CHEMPA. Ask on the loop to borrow or buy.

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WriteShop 1 Supply List:

WriteShop 1 Student Workbook

◻ Colored pencils

◻ Pencil and loose-leaf paper

◻ Good thesaurus - not a junior thesaurus

◻ Good dictionary - not a junior dictionary

◻ Optional: Copies of consumable sheets if using for more than one child

◻ Optional, but recommended: Writer's INC

WriteShop II

Lead Teacher: Chauna G.

For a description of the curriculum, see www.writeshop.com. Choose WriteShop II. During the fall semester, WriteShop II reviews and expands on the techniques learned in WriteShop I. In the spring, students begin writing basic five-paragraph essays. The year typically ends with an historical essay which is polished by the students and shared on presentation day.

This class is for 8th graders who have completed WriteShop I.

The teacher introduces each week's lesson at co-op, and the students complete four related days of homework in their student workbooks. The week's lessons usually produce a paper (a paragraph or essay), which they bring back to class for feedback. Parents oversee the homework and check the writing assignments for initial requirements using check sheets from the manual. There is instruction at orientation on how to do this. Parents do not need to purchase teacher manuals to do their part; the answer key is scanned and uploaded onto the website with password protection for the parents to access online for their reference.

The 4th edition used at co-op has traditionally been in a large, red three-ring binder. That is still available. If purchased from WriteShop, they now publish the exact same information in a soft-side workbook. Either type book, binder or soft-side, is correct for co-op.

Most families make copies of needed sheets, so the manual stays clean for future children/students.

Each student needs a WriteShop II Student Workbook:

Rainbow

WriteShop

It is also available as a downloadable PDF E-book that can be purchased from WriteShop and printed for multiple students in your family.

A family might be able to borrow or buy one used. Because CHEC has used this curriculum many years, there are plenty of copies floating around CHEC and CHEMPA. Ask on the loop to borrow or buy.

_________________________

WriteShop II Supply List:

WriteShop II Student Workbook

◻ Pencil & paper

◻ Colored Pencils

◻ Optional: Copies of consumable sheets if using for more than one child

◻ Optional, but recommended: Writer's INC

Junior High Science Program - General Information

AT HOME

The content of the science courses is learned at home through the wonderful and easy-to-read Apologia texts under the supervision of the parents. Parents should ensure that their science students are working through the material at a pace to be ready for the lab classes at co-op (usually 5-7 pages per day). The parents oversee the reading, the completion of the On Your Own questions, the completion of the Study Guide (Chapter Review), and the testing. Because Apologia was written for the homeschool family, this can be done easily with a non-science parent and a diligent student! All that the families need are the texts and the solutions manuals AND the discipline and patterns to make sure the work is being done! The first module (chapter) is read before the first co-op. The year-long science calendar for the students to follow is on the 2019-2020 Info tab of the CHEC website, and most teachers link to it on their Classroom Connection. Students follow the lab teacher’s calendar if a different one is provided. ALL science classes must allow at least two full school weeks to complete the modules. These two weeks—usually ten school days—consist of six reading days, two co-op lab days, one study day, and one test day. If a different schedule is presented, it should give more time on a module, not less.

All testing is done at home, proctored by the parents. This frees co-op days for group activities and instruction that can only happen at co-op. Although parents have test keys, some teachers are available to help with grading tests.

AT CO-OP

The labs and experiments are done at co-op. This means that the mess is made and cleaned up at co-op. The teachers oversee the experiments and put them in the context of the chapter. In some of the books there are a few chapters with no experiments. These modules and others are developed with appropriate videos, guest speakers, and/or teacher lectures.

THE TEXTS

Co-op uses the first editions in the junior high classes, but 2nd editions have been used by students in classes with no problem. The books for all the junior high and senior high science classes are available to rent from co-op.

General Science Lab - 7th Graders

Lead Teacher: Ginger C.

Exploring Creation with General Science is the 7th grade text. See www.apologia.com to learn about the curriculum.

Note: After the elementary program where students intensely focus on one scientific topic per year (botany, the human body, astronomy, etc.), this text, which is purposefully general, may seem like a light treatment of too many topics. After this year, the texts return to in-depth topics per year (physical science, biology, etc.). There is a reason for this one-year multi-topic approach, and there are benefits as well.

Apologia's original upper-level science program started with physical science in the 8th grade and went through all the traditional sciences for high school. Homeschooling parents expressed an interest in a 7th grade text so they could have a complete package for junior high and high school. In response, Apologia created Exploring Creation with General Science to be an overview of the various orders and systems around us. The book often points this out by referencing a future (high school) science class or text and explaining that much more will be learned about a subject in that future class. This is meant to be a teaser, but some parents and students have found it frustrating. Perhaps knowing the publisher's reason for this approach will ease that frustration.

One of the benefits of this unique year is that students focus on a new kind of learning while the depth of information is manageable. Starting in 7th grade, students learn to read and engage content in a new way. This book is a good transition into reading for knowledge that is expected to be retained, and during this year, students learn that they must work for that knowledge. Beginning in junior high, students will encounter paragraphs that must be read over and over to understand. They will be asked to pull various concepts together and study for chapter tests. Many (if not most) fail the first few tests. This grants an opportunity to evaluate and pinpoint study weaknesses and retake tests. This strategy helps students master the science, but more importantly, they develop study habits for the future. In 7th grade, much of what they are learning is how to manage a new type of material, and they learn to study.

Because this text is structured like the rest of the junior high and senior high Apologia texts, it allows the students to become familiar with the format. The frequent change of topics grants grace: if students fall behind or fail to understand a concept, they do not have to go back to the beginning (as they must do if they miss concepts in Chemistry or Physics, for example). They can just pick themselves up, dust off, and move on, confident that they will see the material again in more depth when they are more mature.

Of course, reading the text and learning to study is a key component of the course, but until the material is applied (through experiments or demonstrations), students often do not fully grasp the concept. Therefore, students enrolled in this course can expect to participate in lots of hands-on experiments each Friday at co-op.

In addition to the required text and solutions manual (both available to rent), students are encouraged to purchase the Exploring Creation with General Science, 2nd Edition, Student Notebook. This Student Notebook highlights and reinforces the main concepts from the text. As the student completes each module, he/she can learn how to identify the "key" points from the topic(s) and further develop successful study skills and strategies.

Please note: Apologia just released a 3rd edition of this textbook, and CHEC is pursuaded that switching over to the new edition is not in our best interest at this time. Changes in the 3rd edition are significant and will cause confusion in the schedule of the class.

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General Science (7th) Supply List:

◻ Book and Solutions Manual (available to rent)

Exploring Creation with General Science Student Notebook (recommended)

Physical Science Lab - 8th Graders

Lead Teacher: Laura B.

Exploring Creation with Physical Science is the 8th grade text. See www.apologia.com to learn about the curriculum.

Class time will be devoted to performing the experiments in the book. A lab notebook is provided in class and will be kept at co-op for the duration of the year.

_________________________

Physical Science (8th) Supply List:

◻ Book and Solutions Manual (available to rent)

◻ Spiral notebook (3-subject minimum) or binder with loose leaf paper for taking notes, working the On-Your-Own problems, and completing Study Guides/Tests

Junior High Math Program - General Information

The Junior High math program aims to lay a solid foundation for students so they are well prepared for higher math classes such as algebra and geometry. Co-op's program includes review of material and skills previously learned, but it also incorporates an introduction to more abstract concepts. Several classes are offered, all with different pacing according to the needs and readiness of the students. One primary purpose of junior high math is to give students time to develop more abstract thinking that comes with maturity (literally allowing time for the brain to get older!).

A traditional high school algebra course is also offered to 8th graders. It is identical to high school algebra--same book, same difficulty.

HOMEWORK

Homeschooled students benefit from self-teaching and taking responsibility for their education. Given excellent textbooks, students can be their own best teacher. Co-op's perspective is that it is important for the students to have answers to the homework while they are doing it. The students are encouraged to do several problems (3–5 problems) and then stop to check their work for accuracy. Traditionally, students have done the entire homework set and then checked the work. Without checking along the way, however, they are possibly practicing the skill being learned incorrectly. Only perfect practice makes perfect! So, to be clear, the answers are given to the student to check their work as they do the homework, not after they complete it. If a parent thinks a student will be tempted to cheat (copy the answers without doing the work), she might keep the solutions manual, having him seek her out for the answers every few problems.

Important: There is only so much that can be done in one hour per week; therefore, the student must be industrious at home during the week. During class the teachers answer questions about the previous week's work, but most of the time is spent getting the students ready to do the next week's work through overviews of the upcoming concepts and by working examples. The assignments are given by the teachers and duplicated on the Classroom Connections webpage. Tests are provided by the curriculum and/or the teachers.

TEXTS

All math texts are available for rent at a very reasonable cost.

Junior High Math - 7th Graders

Lead Teacher: Dawn W.

Junior High Math carefully reviews arithmetic learned up through 6th grade. Part of this review includes more difficult variable work and more involved work with integers (positive and negative numbers). The goal of this class is to find holes in learning and develop speed and accuracy so that students have a proper foundation for the higher math classes like algebra. Distractions from not knowing basics must be minimized. For instance, when a student moves to algebra, she should be confident about dividing fractions so she can focus on algebraic concepts.

A traditional junior high math book (Mathematics Today - Harcourt, Brace Jovanovich) has been purchased by co-op. Parents of participating students receive the book and pay a reasonable rental fee at orientation. Algebra can follow this course.

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Junior High Math (7th) Supply List:

◻ Book (available to rent)

◻ Pencil

◻ Notebook

Pre-Algebra - 7th and 8th Graders

Lead Teacher: Katherine W.

The co-op pre-algebra course is available for 8th graders who choose not to take algebra their 8th grade year. It may also be an excellent fit for 7th graders who are ready for the challenge of a more rigorous course before taking algebra in 8th grade.

Co-op’s pre-algebra course has been designed to enhance students’ critical thinking skills and to begin introducing students to more abstract mathematical concepts. While students experience the excitement of learning algebraic concepts, they have many opportunities to practice arithmetic that may still be a bit rusty. Students work with decimals, fractions, positive and negative numbers, and percentages, but all in an algebraic context. The textbook is full of challenging word problems with the aim of enhancing the mathematical reasoning skills of the students.

A traditional pre-algebra text (McDougal Littel Math, Course 3) has been purchased by co-op. Parents of participating students receive the book and pay a reasonable rental fee at orientation. Algebra can follow this course.

_________________________

Pre-Algebra (8th) Supply List:

◻ Book and test solutions manual (available to rent)

◻ Notebook or binder with paper

◻ Simple calculator for occasional use (if a purchase is required, please consider high school needs before purchasing.)

Algebra for 8th Graders

Lead Teacher: Shana A.

This traditional algebra I course uses Paul Foerster’s Algebra I, which has been purchased by co-op. Parents of participating students receive the book and pay a reasonable rental fee at orientation.

_________________________

Algebra for 8th Graders Supply List:

◻ Book (available to rent)

◻ Notebook or binder with paper

◻ Scientific or Graphing Calculator (see recommendations under High School Math)

Electives - General Information

For the junior high students, there is a two-year rotation of classes during the elective hour. In the even years, shop and home economics have typically been offered. This year junior high students may join the high school in Choir, Healthy Habits, or Journalism. 8th graders have the additional option of taking the high school Spanish I or Drama classes.

Choir

Lead Teacher: Scott B.

This class, open to 7th - 12th grade students, will learn and present sacred and secular choral music from a variety of composers and genres. The students will learn to sing in multi-part harmony and to use proper diction, breathing, and tonal production for singing.

Choir may require one hour per week of practice at home.

This class may require a small fee to cover copyright and license fees for music and for performance costs during the year.

This class will have an attendance cap and will be open to high school students first. If it does not fill up, it will be opened to 8th graders and then to 7th graders. Parents should carefully consider the pros and cons of having their particular 7th grader in a class with high school seniors.

Co-op owns a set of choir textbooks that are checked out to students at orientation. Although there is no rental fee, there is a fee if the book is lost or abused.

_________________________

Choir Supply List:

◻ Possible small fee for purchase of music (based on number of students and performance selections)

◻ Black 1" 3-ring binder

Healthy Habits

Lead Teacher: Kerri H.

This class lecture time will explore the eating and lifestyle habits that contribute to healthy bodies and minds, and there will be a physical education element to be followed at home. Lecture topics will include the various parts of a diet (calories, carbs, fiber, protein, fat, water, etc.), common diseases that are lifestyle related, and encouragement to take control of one's health and nutrition. The Couch to 5K app will be each student's trainer during the week, with the rest of the students and teachers providing accountability. This class will require about 2 hours of work (exercise) at home per week, but as students near their 5K goal, their exercise time may increase.

The course will be taught using The Great Courses: Nutrition Made Clear as a teacher resource, but students are not expected to purchase this material.

Healthy Habits is open to 7th - 12th graders. There will be an attendance cap, and preference will be given to high school students.

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Healthy Habits Supply List:

◻ Couch to 5K app

Journalism

Lead Teacher: Wendy R.

Lead Teacher: Beth P.

The goal for the year-long journalism class is to produce a CHEC newspaper with interesting writing, quality photographs and excellent design. This will be accomplished by using the fall semester to overview the different skills and talents that go into making a newspaper. During the spring semester students will apply the information gained during the fall by producing a newspaper. Class topics include ethics in journalism, writing great articles, interviewing skills, photography, satire, sports writing, cartoons and desktop publishing. A field trip to a local newsroom and talks from several accomplished guest speakers will serve to keep the learning interesting and relevant. Students will gain experience working on a team but will also be able to specialize in areas of interest during the spring semester. Students who take this course should be motivated, cheerful, and respectful, and should work diligently on whatever is requested of them. Parents should expect no more than one hour of homework from the class each week.

This class is open to 7th – 12th graders. It will have an attendance cap, and preference will be given to Junior High students. Wendy R. will provide suggestions for additional work that parents of high school students may want to utilize as they plan high school transcripts.

There will be additional reading assignments, but those are still being researched and evaluated. Plenty of notice will be given once those titles are decided upon.

_________________________

Journalism Supply List:

◻ notebook for taking notes

◻ small 3-ring binder for handouts (1/2" should be big enough)

Spanish I

Lead Teacher: Michael G./Rebecca B.

The primary objective of Spanish I is to develop an extensive, practical vocabulary with a functioning understanding of basic grammar. This builds a foundation for communication in Spanish and with Spanish-speaking people. The course provides foundations for sound grammar including correct articles, personal and possessive pronouns, beginning conjugation of verbs, and practical idioms.

Because of the importance of constant drill of vocabulary and practice of basic grammar, there are weekly quizzes over the vocabulary list and assigned language skills to provide accountability and assessment.

A flash-card system is necessary for most students to succeed in a foreign language.

Other than index cards for flash cards, all other materials are furnished in class.

This class, offered during the elective hour, will require a reasonable amount of daily attention, much like any other traditional high school coursework.

This class is open to 8th - 12th graders.

_________________________

Spanish I Supply List:

◻ Index cards to be used for flash cards

Drama

Lead Teacher: Marissa M.

This class is an intro to theatre arts for students who are interested in acting, stage management, technical theatre, prop/costume/set design, and directing.

Students will acquire and hone life skills such as public speaking, collaborating in a group setting, memorizing, quick thinking, problem solving, considering the feelings of others, and following directions.

Students will perform monologues, produce scenes, and produce a play in the spring.

1-2 hours of weekly homework will include memorizing lines and basic drama terms and definitions, as well as preparing necessary but simple props, costumes, and/or set pieces. As the performance date of the spring play draws near, there may be some out-of-class meetings and dress rehearsals. Students should expect 4-6 hours of outside work per week during the two weeks leading up to production.

Co-op owns a set of drama textbooks that are checked out to students at orientation. Although there is no rental fee, there is a fee if the book is lost or abused.

Drama is available for 8th - 12th grade students. There is an attendance cap, and preference will be given to high school students.

_________________________

Drama Supply List:

◻ A 1" 3-ring binder with notebook paper will be needed for scripts and notes.

◻ A sharpened pencil with eraser

◻ Two highlighters of different colors


Independent Studies

If there is an hour that a junior high student does not need a course being offered, he may choose to have a "study hall" in the foyer, doing work assigned by parents or visiting quietly. Junior high students may have only one independent study hour.

HIGH SCHOOL

9th - 12th Grades

Curriculum Coordinator - Christie G.

Senior High Writing Program - General Information

The writing programs at CHEC focus on developing clear and effective communication of ideas and positions, using proper structure and style while correctly documenting sources.

A NOTE ON GRAMMAR- A must read!

Although grammar naturally comes up in the writing classes and curricula, formal grammar is not taught in the CHEC writing classes. For a student to be in a CHEC writing class, he must be doing a grammar program at home. Typically, a high school English credit assumes instruction in writing, literature, grammar and vocabulary. Co-op takes the writing portion of the English requirement very seriously, but that does not imply that the other portions may be neglected. If a parent does not feel equipped to teach grammar at home, she can learn alongside her student. Everyone needs good grammar.

If parents are sure their older high school students have mastered basic grammar, they may be tempted to neglect or cease grammar assignments. Because college papers and college entrance exams assume a higher understanding of grammar, a parent should not assume that once basic grammar is mastered, the student can stop studying. Parallelism and the correct case of a pronoun, for instance, are almost always tested on college entrance exams. They are not easily understood just by hearing good grammar spoken. They require detailed understanding of sentence structure and grammar rules.

Most formal grammar curricula include composition. Because the students are taking writing at co-op, most parents have students skip the composition.

There are MANY strong formal grammar programs available. Ask for favorites on the loop.

***** REQUIRED resource*****

Although co-op writing teachers do not teach formal grammar, they often mark grammar and mechanical mistakes when giving feedback on a paper. Because the students are all using different grammar programs at home, it is difficult, if not impossible, for the teacher to send them to the appropriate pages in their grammar programs.

Since every home should have a good grammar handbook with all the rules, CHEC is asking every family with a student in a high school writing class to purchase Writers INC: A Student Handbook for WRITING and LEARNING. Then teachers can easily point their students to a needed explanation in this resource.

Writer's INC has everything from rules on commas to how to write a cause-and-effect essay. It is an excellent resource for every family, and one that students need now and in college. There are several editions; any should do.

Writers INC is NOT a grammar curriculum that provides exercises and practice. Students need to continue in their grammar development through a curriculum that challenges them to practice and edit using the rules of the English language.

Amazon is one place to purchase new and used copies of Writers INC.

HOMEWORK

Just as with any core subject class at co-op, the bulk of the work for this class is done at home. To participate in a writing class the students MUST do the writing assignments on time and submit them in the form required by the teacher (or curriculum). The teachers should let the parents know if the student is not handing in his or her work or not following instructions, but the parents really should know the status of the work as they oversee it at home. As in all classes, parents should find time to occasionally talk to their students' writing teachers to ask for honest assessments of their students' diligence and progress. Sometimes teachers need encouragement to share honestly how a student is doing, especially if it is not all good news.

Put That in Writing 1 (PTIW 1 on the schedule)

Lead Teacher: Jennifer B

A description of Put That in Writing, Level One is found here. This curriculum emphasizes the well-written and well-considered paragraph--building opinion and substantiated information into student work. Although the curriculum is written to develop a paragraph, for co-op purposes, the curriculum is tweaked to develop five-paragraph essays.

The teacher introduces the week's lesson at co-op, and the students do four related days of homework in their student manuals. Over several weeks, the lessons have students produce papers which the students bring to class for feedback from the teachers (and sometimes peers). This feedback is provided both during the writing process and on the final product.

A second year of PTIW 1 is available to students that would continue to benefit from the program in their growth as writers. The co-op teacher and home teacher will work together in determining second-year high school writing placement.

Parents oversee the homework. Parents MUST read their students' writing before papers come back to class, and the parents MUST engage their students regarding previous feedback given and regarding each week's writing objectives. Parents should interact with the students using the check sheets from the manual. Students should read their own words aloud to their parents and engage them about what they have said to learn if they are communicating effectively and saying what they mean to say. Friday at co-op should not be the first time a student asks for feedback. The students can expect to accomplish the maximum growth in their writing only by faithfully utilizing their parents.

There is instruction at orientation to teach the parents about the curriculum's format and to explain the expected role of parents of writing students.

Each student needs the spiral student text and answer packet. The answer packet should come with each manual. However, if you buy used or borrow the manual, the answer packet may be missing. There are only a few times in class where the answer packet may be helpful. Students are never required to bring it to class. A solution to missing packets will be discussed at orientation.

Students may use the first or second edition of the text. Here is the book at Rainbow Resource. There are many used copies in the local homeschool community and online, and books are also available for rent from co-op.

Co-op also has PTIW 1 books to rent for a reasonable amount.

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Put That in Writing 1 Supply List:

Put That in Writing, Level One manual with optional answer packet (available to rent)

Writers INC

◻ Pocket folder

◻ Pencil or pen

◻ Notebook or loose-leaf paper for notetaking

Put That in Writing 2 (PTIW 2 on the schedule)

Lead Teacher: Wendy R.

A description of Put That in Writing, Level Two is found here.

This second high school writing class focuses on preparing the student to produce original compositions in a variety of formats typically expected in college courses. The course aims to benefit both college-bound students and those taking a different path by coaching them through developing and supporting an argument and expressing that argument with precise, yet compelling language.

For those students wishing to pursue further excellence in academic writing, an optional second year is offered in which students concentrate on choosing viable topics, refining voice and style, utilizing college-level references, and asserting and supporting valid arguments. The same PTIW 2 manual will be used for the 2nd year. The co-op teacher and home teacher will work together in determining second-year PTIW-2 placement.

Most of the units from PTIW 2 will be covered each year. Emphasis is placed on gaining experience in the different types of essays required, employing literary devices as well as proper formatting and organization.

Each unit is introduced in class, and the writing process is demonstrated before students work on the corresponding unit at home. The teachers/graders should be considered “writing coaches” who provide both positive feedback and suggestions for areas of improvement in which the student should focus during the coming week. Generally, the students submit a finished essay or a draft each week.

Parents oversee the homework and are required to read their students’ writing before it is submitted as well as read the comments made by CHEC graders. Parents are highly encouraged to engage their students regarding the week's writing objective.

Put That in Writing, Level Two can be purchased from Rainbow. Because this manual is not consumable, used copies are available online and in the CHEC community.

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Put That in Writing 2 Supply List:

Put That in Writing, Level Two manual

Put That in Writing, Level Two Answer packet (if parent desires)

Writers INC

◻ Notebook or loose-leaf paper

◻ Internet access for gaining reference material

Senior High Science Program - General Information

AT HOME

The content of the science courses is learned at home through the wonderful and easy-to-read Apologia texts under the supervision of the parents. Parents need to make sure that their science student is working through the material at a pace to be ready for the lab classes at co-op (usually 5–7 pages per day). The parent oversees the student’s reading, answering the On Your Own questions, completing the Study Guide (a chapter review), working the Practice Problems (only in chemistry and physics), and taking the tests. Parents can grade the tests with the answer book provided. If parents need help evaluating answers and giving a grade, teachers and other parents are available to give input.

Because Apologia was written for the homeschool family, all the above can be done easily with a non-science parent and a diligent student! The only things needed are the text, the solutions manual, and determination to make sure work is being done!

The first module (chapter) is read before the first co-op. The year-long science calendar for the students to follow is on the 2019-2020 Info tab of the CHEC website, and most teachers link to it on their Classroom Connection. Students follow the lab teacher’s calendar if a different one is provided. ALL science classes must allow at least two full school weeks to complete the modules. These two weeks—usually ten school days—consist of six reading days, two co-op lab days, one study day, and one test day. If a different schedule is presented, it should allow more time for a module, not less.

All testing is done at home and proctored by the parents. This frees co-op days for group activities and instruction that can only happen at co-op. Although parents have test keys, some teachers are available to help grade tests.

AT CO-OP

The labs and experiments are done at co-op. This means that the mess is made and cleaned up at co-op. The teachers oversee the experiments and put them in the context of the chapter. In some of the books there are a few modules that do not have experiments. Those chapters and others are supplemented with appropriate videos, guest speakers, and/or teacher lectures.

TEXTS

CHEC uses the first editions in the Biology and Anatomy and Physiology classes, and the second editions for Chemistry and Physics. Click here to learn about the curricula. When looking at the books on the Apologia website, it is noticeable that most editions that co-op is using are not the most recent editions of the textbooks. The co-op science teachers carefully evaluate new editions every time they come out, and our teachers make purposeful decisions about which edition to use. Newer is not always better, and great care is taken to make sure that the science is up to date, the book is readable, and that the information is accurate. The books for all the junior high and senior high science classes are available to rent from co-op for as low as $5/year, depending on the class.

Apologia Biology

Lead Teacher: Eric R.

See the Apologia website for a description of the course. At co-op, students do only the lab work. The students are responsible for completing all readings, questions, reviews, and testing at home. Biology is blessed to have many expensive microscopes, slide kits, dissection kits, and more. The biology students pay for their dissection specimens at orientation--approximately $45. The text, Exploring Creation through Biology, can be rented from co-op.

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High School Biology Supply List:

◻ Book (available to rent)

◻ Notebook (for lab)

◻ Optional: folder for hand-outs

Apologia Chemistry

Lead Teacher: Karen R.

See the Apologia website for a description of the course. The students do only the lab work at co-op. The students are responsible for completing all readings, questions, reviews, and testing at home. CHEC owns all the lab equipment needed to perform the experiments. Chemistry students must have completed Algebra I. The text, Exploring Creation through Chemistry, 2nd Edition, can be rented from co-op.

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High School Chemistry Supply List:

◻ Book (available to rent)

◻ Composition Notebook (for lab)

Apologia Anatomy and Physiology

Lead Teacher: Craig D.

See the Apologia website for a description of the course. The students do only the lab work at co-op. The students are responsible for completing all readings, questions, reviews, and testing at home. CHEC owns all the lab equipment needed to perform the experiments. The students pay for dissection specimens at orientation--approximately $50. Students in Anatomy and Physiology must have completed biology and chemistry. The text, The Human Body: Fearfully and Wonderfully Made, can be rented from co-op.

Note: If you follow the link above to the Apologia website, you will notice that the 2nd edition course has a new name, Advanced Biology. Co-op's The Human Body textbook is the first edition of Advanced Biology.

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High School Anatomy & Physiology Supply List:

◻ Book (available to rent)

Apologia Physics

Lead Teacher: Ashley S.

See the Apologia website for a description of the course. The students do only the lab work at co-op. The students are responsible for completing all readings, questions, reviews, and testing at home. CHEC owns all the lab equipment needed to perform the experiments. The text, Exploring Creation through Physics, 2nd Edition, can be rented from co-op. Note: those who provide their own text must use the 2nd edition.

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High School Physics Supply List:

◻ Book (available to rent)

◻ Recommended: 3-ring binder for lab notes and activities

Senior High Math Program - General Information

Homeschooled students benefit from self-teaching and taking responsibility for their education. Given excellent textbooks, students can be their own best teacher. Co-op's perspective is that it is important for the students to have answers to the homework while they are doing it. The students are encouraged to do several problems (3–5 problems) and then stop to check their work for accuracy. Traditionally, students have done the entire homework set and then checked the work. Without checking along the way, however, they are possibly incorrectly practicing the skill being learned. Only perfect practice makes perfect! So, to be clear, the answers are given to the students to check their work as they do the homework, not after they complete it. Parents may decide to keep the solutions near them to monitor the students' work as they occasionally check their work. This would provide accountability in using the answers correctly.

Important: There is only so much that can be done in one hour per week. Therefore, the student must be industrious at home during the week. During class the teachers answer questions about the previous week's work, but most of the time is spent getting them ready to do the next week's work through overviews of the upcoming concepts and by working examples. The assignments are given by the teachers and duplicated on the Classroom Connections webpage. Tests are provided by the curriculum and/or the teachers. Some teachers offer assistance grading the tests if the parents need help.

TEXTS

All math texts are available for rent at a very reasonable cost.

CALCULATORS

Graphing calculators have become an essential part of every American high school math class, and they should be part of co-op math classes as well. The math education that students receive at co-op is excellent, but students are truly hindered in their mathematical development when they do not have a graphing calculator that they are using throughout high school. Co-op will allow any scientific or graphing calculator for Algebra I and Algebra II, but we will only support (give instructions for and know how to operate) TI calculators. The two calculators listed below are both recommended.

1. TI-84 Plus—This expensive (approximately $90) graphing calculator is worth every penny and is recommended for college-bound students. It will be a boon to students on college entrance exams, but only if they have used it consistently for years. Any student from grade 7 or 8 with plans for college will greatly benefit from this calculator. Because of its price, co-op will not require it, but it is very highly recommended. *** Please note that every traditional high-school student in America is likely using a graphing calculator, not a scientific calculator. *** This calculator can be purchased from Walmart, Amazon, and Staples. There are also many used ones available for purchase on Amazon, Ebay, and the local loop. Note: any of the calculators in the TI-80 family of calculators will work, but once a student has chosen her calculator, she should stick with it. That is, students should not borrow a different calculator each year. Any calculator borrowing solution should be a long-term solution.

2. TI-30 XIIS—This very affordable ($15 - $20) scientific calculator will provide the basic functionality that students need for high school. It is only recommended for students who do not plan to attend any college after high school. Students who plan for dual enrollment at NTCC should not use this calculator.

Parents should not make a hasty decision about their calculator purchase. All the math teachers will be very happy to discuss and provide counsel about which calculator would be best for each individual student.

Algebra I

Lead Teacher: Daniel S.

This traditional algebra I course uses Paul Foerster’s Algebra I, which has been purchased by co-op. Parents of participating students receive the book and pay a reasonable rental fee at orientation.

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Algebra I Supply List:

◻ Book (available to rent)

◻ Notebook or binder with paper

◻ Scientific or Graphing Calculator (see recommendations)

Geometry

Lead Teacher: Katherine W.

This traditional geometry course uses Harold Jacob’s Geometry, which has been purchased by CHEC. Parents of participating students receive the book and pay a reasonable rental fee at orientation.

Note: Please do not purchase an expensive calculator for geometry. Most smart phones or simple calculators (with trig functions) work just fine. If a calculator purchase is necessary, please consider asking for guidance from the CHEC math teachers. Not all calculators are created equal.

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Geometry Supply List:

◻ Book (available to rent)

◻ Protractor

◻ Compass

◻ Calculator (see note above)

Algebra II

Lead Teacher: Shana A.

This traditional algebra II course uses Paul Foerster’s Algebra II and Trigonometry. Although this book includes trigonometry, the class covers only the algebra II portion of the text. Parents of participating students receive the book and pay a reasonable rental fee at orientation.

Students need a graphing or scientific calculator for this class. Students with any plans for college (including dual enrollment at NTCC) should have a graphing calculator. Those with no plans for college may use a scientific calculator. See the section on Calculators above for recommendations.

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Algebra II Supply List:

◻ Book (available to rent)

◻ Scientific or Graphing Calculator (see note above)

Trigonometry – Spring Semester Only

Lead Teacher: Ashley S.

This traditional trigonometry course uses Paul Foerster’s Precalculus with Trigonometry. Although this book includes precalculus, the class covers only the trigonometry portion of the text. Parents of participating students receive the book and pay a reasonable rental fee at orientation.

Students need a graphing or scientific calculator for this class. Students with any plans for college (including dual enrollment at NTCC) should have a graphing calculator. Those with no plans for college may use a scientific calculator. See the section on Calculators above for recommendations.

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Trigonometry Supply List:

◻ Book (available to rent)

◻ Scientific or Graphing Calculator (see note above)

High School Social Studies - General Information

CHEC's Social Studies program rotates through the traditional high school courses.

Freshmen and sophomores are on a two-year rotation through World Geography and World History. During odd-numbered years, they study World Geography. During even-numbered years, they study World History.

Juniors and seniors are on a two-year rotation through American History and U.S. Government. During odd-numbered years, they study U.S. Government. During even-numbered years, they study American History.

This year we are offering a new course, History of Western Philosophy. It may appeal to those that have already completed the more traditional approach or who would like to supplement the more traditional courses with this social studies elective. Like any of the other traditional social studies courses offered by CHEC, this class will require a reasonable amount of daily attention.

World Geography

Lead Teacher: Beth P.

World Geography provides students with an understanding of man's organization of the physical world and the vocabulary used to describe it. This course includes exposure to the names and locations of the earth's continents, countries, islands, oceans, rivers, etc., and students also learn about the locations and cultures of nations and people groups.

At home, students use various resources to discover and learn about their world, and they create a notebook to catalog what they learn. Fridays are "cultural immersion" days where students explore various cultures, customs, prayer needs, foods, music, and important landmarks of global neighbors.

Books and supplies needed:

1. Trail Guide to World Geography student notebook from GeoMatters.com

Make sure that under the format options, the "High School Digital Download" for $14.95 is selected. This provides students with the map assignments and other work done at home using an atlas and globe.

Parents may purchase a Teacher's manual, but it is not necessary for this co-op class. All assignments will be given through Classroom Connections and will be checked for completion, not accuracy, in class.

2. 3-ring binder (2 or 3 inch) with 8 dividers. All assignments will need to be kept in this binder, and directions will be given in class on how to set up the notebook.

3. Atlas of World Geography----every week the students will be using an atlas at home to complete the homework assignments. Know Geography World Atlas Grades 9-12 is good, inexpensive, and available from GeoMatters.com. This same atlas is also available on Amazon as Rand McNally's Atlas of World Geography, 6th edition.

4. A set of map pencils or fine tip markers for doing map work and illustrations.

5. Index cards to make flash cards.

There will be additional reading assignments, but those are still being researched and evaluated. Plenty of notice will be given once those titles are chosen.

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World Geography Supply List:

Trail Guide to World Geography student notebook

◻ World Atlas (see above for two options)

◻ 3-ring binder (2 or 3 inch)

◻ 8 dividers

◻ A set of map pencils or fine tip markers

◻ Index cards

U.S. Government

Lead Teacher: Allison A.

This course concerns the nature of the U.S. political system, its development over the past two hundred years, and how it works today. We begin with a foundational understanding of the origins of our governmental system, starting with the founders’ philosophies concerning the purpose of government and its role in society. We then examine in some detail the principle processes and institutions through which our political system functions. We also study each branch of government and how they operate both individually and collectively as a balance to one another. We look primarily at national politics and the national government, as well as current events and current political topics.

In addition, basic economics is integrated into the broader discussion of national government. We discuss the origin of money, investment, business cycles, recessions, inflation, supply and demand, and more.

We use a variety of instructional methods, including lecture, discussion, group work, and independent research. Diverse documentary materials, including primary and secondary resources, are used to supplement textbook readings.

Books needed:

These are Amazon links. The books may be cheaper elsewhere or you may just prefer to support other businesses, but on the Amazon site you can read a description and get the ISBN number (for shopping elsewhere) when you scroll down to the description. The Magruder books are very inexpensive when purchased used at Amazon and other sites.

Magruder's American Government 2009, Student Edition

Magruder's American Government 2009 Consumable Essential Questions Journal

Whatever Happened to Penny Candy? A Fast, Clear, and Fun Explanation of the Economics You Need For Success in Your Career, Business, and Investments (An Uncle Eric Book)

A Bluestocking Guide: Economics Paperback

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U.S. Government Supply List:

◻ The four books listed above.

History of Western Philosophy

Lead Teacher: Chas C.

Ideas have consequences, and those consequences are often the events we read of in history books. From the Pre-Socratics to Postmodernism, significant figures in thought established a root system that blossomed in historical events and now flourishes in secular society. This course will highlight many of these historical figures, the philosophies they taught, and the church’s response throughout the centuries.

There is no textbook for this course, but the student is required to keep a designated, spiral notebook which contains three weekly entries (the students will receive the notebook and a printed example of a notebook entry on the first day of class to guide them through the year):

1. Notes from the lecture - The content of this class is designed to teach the student how to take notes in a classroom setting and while reading. Guided notetaking will be taught during the first several lectures, but the goal is for the student to develop this skill by the end of the course.

2. An Academic Journal Entry - The entry consists of a minimum of one paragraph that summarizes a philosophical idea presented in the lecture and an expression of the idea in modern culture. At the beginning of the course, the students will receive assistance with ideas that create cultural awareness and how to craft the journal entry. However, by the end of the year, they will be expected to complete this exercise with less guidance.

3. Two Questions - The student must think of two questions related to the lecture given and record them in the notebook.

Through the development of this notebook, the student should be able to identify critical contributors in philosophical thought, express the contribution of the philosopher, and articulate the church's response at the completion of the course.

To aid the parents and help the students throughout the week, links to the recorded lecture will be available. To assist the student in understanding the material, though not required for class participation, suggested readings to be completed outside of class will be provided each week.

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History of Western Philosophy Supply List:

◻ Writing utensil

◻ Notebook (provided)

Electives - General Information

CHEC electives are chosen intentionally to prepare students for life but are also traditional high school offerings with the final high school transcript in mind.

CHEC makes every attempt to offer electives in predictable patterns for the ease of high school planning.

Odd-year electives: American Sign Language II, Spanish I, Spanish II (to be offered only on even years after this year), Choir, Drama, Healthy Habits, and Journalism. In the past, Music History has been offered as an odd-year elective, but it did not make for this school year.

Odd-year electives during the math hour: SAT Math Prep and Traditional Logic I during the first semester and Traditional Logic 2 the second semester.

Even-year electives: American Sign Language I, Spanish II, Art, Choir, and Speech.

Even-year elective during the math hour: Personal Finance.

The electives offered during the math hour are for the students who have completed CHEC's math series and for those who opt out of CHEC's math.

American Sign Language (ASL) II

Lead Teacher: Dawn W.

Students attending this class will build on American Sign Language skills taught in the ASL I class.

This year will be focused on increasing receptive skills, vocabulary, knowledge of deaf culture, and engaging in everyday conversations.

The syllabus for this class will follow that recommended by lifeprint.com, and home assignments will be taken from the lifeprint.com self-study schedule. Assignments may also consist of focusing on specified tasks such as taking online quizzes, doing research papers, attending Deaf events, creating videos, completing worksheets, and developing scripts. In addition, attendance at local deaf meetings or events is highly recommended and will enrich the students’ confidence when speaking with those in the deaf community.

Instruction will be provided through videos, in-class conversation, handouts, and additional reading outside of class to provide a global perspective of deaf culture. Each week students will learn new signs, and in-class conversations will help bridge the gap between learning the sign and reading the sign from the opposite perspective. Deaf culture differs significantly from the mainstream culture in all countries, and the history and progress of the deaf community will be a major topic of discussion. In addition, the class will discuss professional opportunities available to those fluent in ASL.

ASL is recognized as the 3rd most-used language in the world and is deemed a language because it has its own grammar and syntax. ASL is not to be confused with Signing Exact English where English words are just replaced word-for-word with signs.

This class, offered during the elective hour, will require a reasonable amount of daily attention, much like any other traditional high school coursework.

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ASL Supply List:

◻ 1" 3-ring binder with loose-leaf paper

Spanish I

Lead Teacher: Michael G./Rebecca B.

The primary objective of Spanish I is to develop an extensive, practical vocabulary with a functioning understanding of basic grammar. This builds a foundation for communication in Spanish and with Spanish-speaking people. The course provides foundations for sound grammar including correct articles, personal and possessive pronouns, beginning conjugation of verbs, and practical idioms.

Because of the importance of constant drill of vocabulary and practice of basic grammar, there are weekly quizzes over the vocabulary list and assigned language skills to provide accountability and assessment.

A flash-card system is necessary for most students to succeed in a foreign language.

Other than index cards for flash cards, all other materials are furnished in class.

This class, offered during the elective hour, will require a reasonable amount of daily attention, much like any other traditional high school coursework.

This class is open to 8th - 12th graders.

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Spanish I Supply List:

◻ Index cards to be used for flash cards

Spanish II

Lead Teacher: Rosy S.

Spanish II builds on the foundation begun in Spanish I. Students continue building a working vocabulary and develop communication skills such as listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students are expected to use their at-home time to memorize weekly vocabulary lists, practice grammar lessons, and demonstrate proficiency on weekly quizzes. Class time will be used almost exclusively for conversational communication practice.

In addition to practice with the language, students are presented with opportunities to gain knowledge and understanding of the Hispanic culture.

There is no required textbook for this class. Instead, students use online resources, one of which has apps available for use on handheld devices. All resources are free. Students need daily access to the internet to successfully participate in this class. Students without adequate internet access receive a small amount of instruction from class each week, but the lack of participation in online activities greatly limits growth in the Spanish language.

This class, offered during the elective hour, will require a reasonable amount of daily attention, much like any other traditional high school coursework.

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Spanish II Supply List:

◻ Daily access to the Internet

◻ Binder

◻ Optional: Spanish/English dictionary

◻ Optional: 501 Spanish Verbs

Choir

Lead Teacher: Scott B.

This class, open to 7th - 12th grade students, will learn and present sacred and secular choral music from a variety of composers and genres. The students will learn to sing in multi-part harmony and to use proper diction, breathing, and tonal production for singing.

This class may require a small fee to cover copyright and license fees for music and for performance costs during the year.

This class will have an attendance cap and will be open to high school students first. If it does not fill up, it will be opened to 8th graders and then to 7th graders.

Co-op owns a set of choir textbooks that are checked out to students at orientation. Although there is no rental fee, there is a fee if the book is lost or abused.

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Choir Supply List:

◻ Possible small fee for purchase of music (based on number of students and performance selections)

◻ Black 1" 3-ring binder

Drama

Lead Teacher: Marissa M.

This class is an intro to theatre arts for students who are interested in acting, stage management, technical theatre, prop/costume/set design, and directing.

Students will acquire and hone life skills such as public speaking, collaborating in a group setting, memorizing, quick thinking, problem solving, considering the feelings of others, and following directions.

Students will perform monologues, produce scenes, and produce a play in the spring.

1-2 hours of weekly homework will include memorizing lines and basic drama terms and definitions, as well as preparing necessary but simple props, costumes, and/or set pieces. As the performance date of the spring play draws near, there may be some out-of-class meetings and dress rehearsals. Students should expect 4-6 hours of outside work per week during the two weeks leading up to production.

Co-op owns a set of drama textbooks that are checked out to students at orientation. Although there is no rental fee, there is a fee if the book is lost or abused.

Drama is available for 8th - 12th grade students. There is an attendance cap, and preference will be given to high school students.

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Drama Supply List:

◻ A 1" 3-ring binder with notebook paper will be needed for scripts and notes.

◻ A sharpened pencil with eraser

◻ Two highlighters of different colors

Healthy Habits

Lead Teacher: Kerri H.

This class lecture time will explore the eating and lifestyle habits that contribute to healthy bodies and minds, and there will be a physical education element to be followed at home. Lecture topics will include the various parts of a diet (calories, carbs, fiber, protein, fat, water, etc.), common diseases that are lifestyle related, and encouragement to take control of one's health and nutrition. The Couch to 5K app will be each student's trainer during the week, with the rest of the students and teachers providing accountability.

This class will require about 2 hours of work (exercise) at home per week, but as students near their 5K goal, their exercise time may increase.

The course will be taught using The Great Courses: Nutrition Made Clear as a teacher resource, but students are not expected to purchase this material.

Healthy Habits is open to 7th - 12th graders. There will be an attendance cap, and preference will be given to high school students.

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Healthy Habits Supply List:

◻ Couch to 5K app

Journalism

Lead Teacher: Wendy R.

Lead Teacher: Beth P.

The goal for the year-long journalism class is to produce a CHEC newspaper with interesting writing, quality photographs and excellent design. This will be accomplished by using the fall semester to overview the different skills and talents that go into making a newspaper. During the spring semester students will apply the information gained during the fall by producing a newspaper. Class topics include ethics in journalism, writing great articles, interviewing skills, photography, satire, sports writing, cartoons, and desktop publishing. A field trip to a local newsroom and talks from several accomplished guest speakers will serve to keep the learning interesting and relevant. Students will gain experience working on a team but will also be able to specialize into areas of interest during the spring semester. Students who take this course should be motivated, cheerful, and respectful, and should work diligently on whatever is requested of them.

Parents should expect no more than one hour of homework from the class each week.

This class is open to 7th – 12th graders. It will have an attendance cap, and preference will be given to Junior High students. Wendy R. will provide suggestions for additional work that parents of high school students may want to utilize as they plan for high school.

There will be additional reading assignments, but those are still being researched and evaluated. Plenty of notice will be given once those titles are decided upon.

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Journalism Supply List:

◻ notebook for taking notes

◻ small 3-ring binder for handouts (1/2" should be big enough)

Math-Hour Electives

Traditional Logic I and II

Lead Teacher: Jeff W.

Critical thinking, which is the ability to use the faculty of reason to engage ideas and arguments, is a crucial skill. Informal and formal logic provide the foundation for this skill. Armed with some training in logic, students can identify faulty reasoning in themselves and others. So, for example, students can understand why the college professor's argument isn't valid, instead of just having a vague feeling that something isn't adding up. Similarly, as viewers, they have a foundation for understanding why the argument of a talking head on Fox News or CNN sounds fishy—or sound. Logic provides a ground to reason in the face of the barrage of messages from politicians, the news media, advertising, and peers. Instead of being vulnerable, students have some tools for evaluating and engaging these messages.

Logic is a thinking class in which arguments and conclusions are given structure so that patterns reveal their validity. Like numbers, sometimes words just don't add up!

Students will begin with Traditional Logic I (fall) to lay the foundation for the more complicated Traditional Logic II (spring). Students may take the first semester without continuing onto the second semester, but the first half is a prerequisite for the second half.

This class will require a maximum of two hours of homework per week.

The following links for curricula lead to Amazon. These books are available from many other vendors. Feel free to shop around and purchase where you prefer.

Traditional Logic I - Fall Semester - Curriculum

Martin Cothran's Traditional Logic I text

Martin Cothran's Traditional Logic I workbook

Traditional Logic II - Spring Semester - Curriculum

Martin Cothran's Traditional Logic II text

Martin Cothran's Traditional Logic II workbook

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Traditional Logic Supply List:

◻ The text and workbook should be purchased for each semester

SAT Math Prep – Fall Semester Only

Lead Teacher: Ashley S.

This class is designed to teach students tips and tricks for mastering the SAT math test. During co-op each Friday, new tips and tricks from the SAT Prep Black Book will be demonstrated and practiced. Then each week at home, students will apply those new skills as they take the math portion of one SAT practice test. Time will be allotted the following Friday to review any interesting questions from the last test before new tips are introduced.

The SAT Math Prep class will require outside work of around one hour per week, with two hours as the absolute maximum.

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SAT Math Prep Supply List:

SAT Prep Black Book: The Most Effective SAT Strategies Ever Published, 2nd Edition

The Official SAT Study Guide, 2018 Edition

Independent Studies

If there is an hour that high school students do not need a course being offered, they may choose to have a "study hall" in the foyer, doing work assigned by parents or visiting quietly.